Local Commuters: Week 2

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With the acquisition of a new Raspberry Shake, TXESP has additional unlocked opportunities to observe and evaluate local seismic waves.  TXESP’s raspberry shake station, AM.RAD87.SHZ or IP address 10.0.0.74, recorded interesting seismic patterns during the Monday morning commute.  We are located near a major Big Oil company with 1000+ commuters passing nearby every work day.  Over the next month, TXESP plans to observe the seismogram(s) during the peak commuter time from 12:00-15:00hrs UTC (06:00-09:00am CST).  Solid science makes observations, writes deliberate and informative notes, and pose hypotheses from possible patterns of their study.  We will be following this method for one-month.  Here are the data measurements from Week 2.

NOTE: The times noted are UTC, each horizontal line represents 15 minutes of time and the color helps the user differentiate each line of recording from the one above/below. No filter has been applied.

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Jan 29, 2018 Local Traffic

31012018_1200_to1500_scrnsht_RStraffic

Jan 31, 2018 Local Traffic

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Feb 2, 2018 Local Traffic

 

No data is useful data

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During the week of January 28, 2018, four different earthquakes occurred and **were not recorded** here at Station E1TX on the EQ1 Seismograph or Raspberry Shake.  The earthquakes varied in magnitude from 4.6 to 6.1 and distances varying from 20 to 130+ polar degrees.  While the seismograms (Oregon, Costa Rica, Peru, Afghanistan) are NOT detected on the helicorder, and yet had different characteristics…what can this tell us about (1) the sensitivity of the instrumentation AND (2) heterogeneity of the interior structure of the Earth.  WHY? HOW?

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Bringing the Dream to Reality

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On January 23, 2018, TXESP was honored to present seismology to High School young women.  Our activities focused on the cross-cutting facets of seismology: geophysics and engineering.  Attendees were able to see how a simple seismograph instrument can detect teleseismic waves.  Following that new knowledge, we began to apply the purposefully captured seismic data and how engineers use that information describe a building’s safer characteristics (base area, hieght, center of mass).  This event made our day!

YWEJan2018

Teaching Moment: Two For One (day)

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On 25 January 2018, two different earthquakes occurred and recorded here at Station E1TX on the EQ1 Seismograph.  The first event was a M6.2 Russian earthquake at  02:10hrs UTC (shown by the yellow arrow); the second event was a M5.8 California earthquake at 16:39hrs UTC (navy arrow). Below is a comparison of the two events and their associated teleseismic waves recorded.  The two seismograms look similar on the helicorder, and yet had different characteristics…what can this tell us about (1) the sensitivity of the instrumentation AND (2) heterogeneity of the interior structure of the Earth.  WHY? HOW?

 

24012018_1051_scrnsht_Japan_1639_scrnsht_Cali

 

 

Local Commuters: Week 1

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With the acquisition of a new Raspberry Shake, TXESP has additional unlocked opportunities to observe and evaluate local seismic waves.  TXESP’s raspberry shake station, AM.RAD87.SHZ or IP address 10.0.0.74, recorded interesting seismic patterns during the Monday morning commute.  We are located near a major Big Oil company with 1000+ commuters passing nearby every work day.  Over the next month, TXESP plans to observe the seismogram(s) during the peak commuter time from 12:00-15:00hrs UTC (06:00-09:00am CST).  Solid science makes observations, writes deliberate and informative notes, and pose hypotheses from possible patterns of their study.  We will be following this method for one-month.  Let’s see how our inquiry-based investigation begins!

NOTE: The times noted are UTC, each horizontal line represents 15 minutes of time and the color helps the user differentiate each line of recording from the one above/below. No filter has been applied. Happy Wednesday…

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An Active Ring of Fire

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Late this evening, at 08:10 am CST 24Jan2018 (02:10hrs UTC, 25Jan2018), an offshore and moderately large magnitude 6.2 occurred near Nikol’skoye, Russia.  Many citizens, and a few scientists, are asking where the next large earthquake will occur around the “Ring of Fire”. In the past three days, we have observed a minimum of eight magnitude 5.0+ earthquakes around the Pacific coastline.  Not too unusual except that half of the events had magnitudes above M6.0.  Below is a comparison of the event’s seismogram on (1) the EQ-1 and (2) on the Raspberry Shake.  No filters applied.

25012018_0210_extract_Russia25012018_0210_extractRS_Russia25012018_0210_map_Russia

 

 

Advances in Technology – Detection, Data Quality and Expense

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With the acquisition of a new Raspberry Shake, TXESP has unlocked additional opportunities to observe and evaluate local AND global seismicity.  TXESP’s primary seismograph is the EQ1 Education Vertical Seismometer; our back up is the newly acquired Raspberry Shake.  Both instruments’ measurements/data can be found on the our website – http://www.txesp.org.  TXESP operates Station ‘E1TX ‘ with the EQ1, we also operate the RaspberryShake station, AM.RAD87.SHZ or IP address 10.0.0.74,

A citizen may inquire about the observed measurements each instrument records.  ‘Did you record the XX earthquake?’ or ‘How large was that earthquake’ and lastly, ‘How much energy was released during the XX earthquake’.  As scientists, we ask ourselves (and other scientists) these same questions.  The best summary of these inquiries relate to an instrument’s detectability, data quality, and expense. Compare the EQ1 seismometer ($800) with the Raspberry Shake’s (RS) “recording” of the M6.2 Japanese earthquake 01/24/2018 at 10:51hrs UTC.

Shown below is an EQ1 educational seismometer and it’s recorded seismogram of the Japanese earthquake.

Shown below is the Raspberry Shake seismometer ($400) and it’s recorded seismogram of the Japanese earthquake.

NOTE: Both instruments display times noted in UTC.  A Low Pass 2.0Hz filter was applied to the RS seismogram.

Two different technologies, two different price points, and differences in data quality.  We can observe the EQ1 seismometer, at best, detected the M6.2 event; a scientist would not consider this high quality data as you can barely observe the seismic signal above the baseline “noise”.  On the RS, we do not detect this event.  Is one technology better than the other?  Does your inquiry have minimum/maximum requirements?  This is an ongoing research study within the seismology community.

 

 

 

How bad was traffic Wednesday?

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With the acquisition of a new Raspberry Shake, TXESP has additional unlocked opportunities to observe and evaluate local seismic waves.  TXESP’s raspberry shake station, AM.RAD87.SHZ or IP address 10.0.0.74, recorded interesting seismic patterns during the Monday morning commute.  We are located near a major Big Oil company with 1000+ commuters passing nearby every work day.  Over the next month, TXESP plans to observe the seismogram(s) during the peak commuter time from 12:00-15:00hrs UTC (06:00-09:00am CST).  Solid science makes observations, writes deliberate and informative notes, and pose hypotheses from possible patterns of their study.  We will be following this method for one-month.  Let’s see how our inquiry-based investigation begins!

NOTE: The times noted are UTC, each horizontal line represents 15 minutes of time and the color helps the user differentiate each line of recording from the one above/below. No filter has been applied. Happy Wednesday…

 

Tremendous M7.9 Alaskan Earthquake Triggers Tsunami Warnings

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Early this morning, 23Jan2018, an offshore and very LARGE magnitude 7.9 Alaskan earthquake began shaking areas felt throughout the AK mainland and parts of Canada.  The event occurred at 09:31hrs UTC (03:31 am CST) and had a focal depth of ~24km deep.  A tsunami warning was issued for Southern Alaska, the US Pacific Northwest and Northern California.  No damages nor injuries have been reported at this time.

FROM THE USGS:

Large earthquakes are common in the Pacific-North America plate boundary region south of Alaska. Over the preceding century, 11 other M7+ earthquakes have occurred within 600 km of the January 23, 2018 earthquake. Most of these have occurred on the subduction zone interface between the two plates, to the north and northwest of today’s earthquake, including the M 9.2 Great Alaska earthquake of March 1964. The hypocenter of the 1964 event was located about 550 km to the north of the January 23rd earthquake, and the rupture of that event broke much of the shallow subduction zone interface over several hundreds of kilometers. To the southeast of the Alaska Trench, two large (M 7.9 and M 7.8) strike slip earthquakes occurred in November 1987 and March 1988, respectively, several hundreds of kilometers to the east of the January 23, 2018 earthquake. These two earthquakes are not known to have caused any casualties or damage.

 

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E1TX’s EQ1 Educational Seismograph Screenshot.:M7.9 Alaskan earthquake 01/23/2018 at 09:31hrs UTC

23012018_0931_extract_AK

E1TX’s EQ1’s SEISMOGRAM.:M7.9 Alaskan earthquake 01/23/2018 at 09:31hrs UTC

23012018_0931_RScompare4HZ_AK

E1TX’s Raspberry Shake Seismometer: (Top Image) M7.9 Alaskan earthquake 01/23/2018 at 09:31hrs UTC

23012018_0931_map_AK

MAP of the offshore M7.9 Alaskan earthquake on 01/23/20118 at 09:31hrs UTC

 

How bad was traffic today?

WATCH the Earth move LIVE

 

With the acquisition of a new Raspberry Shake, TXESP has additional unlocked opportunities to observe and evaluate local seismic waves.  TXESP’s raspberry shake station, AM.RAD87.SHZ or IP address 10.0.0.74, recorded interesting seismic patterns during the Monday morning commute.  We are located near a major Big Oil company with 1000+ commuters passing nearby every work day.  Over the next month, TXESP plans to observe the seismogram(s) during the peak commuter time from 12:00-15:00hrs UTC (06:00-09:00am CST).  Solid science makes observations, writes deliberate and informative notes, and pose hypotheses from possible patterns of their study.  We will be following this method for one-month.  Let’s see how our inquiry-based investigation begins!

NOTE: The times noted are UTC, each horizontal line represents 15 minutes of time and the color helps the user differentiate each line of recording from the one above/below. No filter has been applied. Happy Monday…